An evaluation of an intervention sequence outline in positive behaviour support for people with autism and severe escape-motivated challenging behaviour

Brian McClean, Ian Grey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Positive behaviour support emphasises the impact of contextual variables to enhance participation, choice, and quality of life. This study evaluates a sequence for implementing changes to key contextual variables for 4 individuals. Interventions were maintained and data collection continued over a 3-year period. Method Functional assessments were conducted with 4 individuals with exceptionally severe challenging behaviours. Interventions were based on the multi-element model of behavioural support (LaVigna & Willis, 2005a). Dependent variables were behavioural ratings of (1) frequency, (2) episodic severity, (3) episodic management difficulty, and measures of (4) mental health status, and (5) quality of life. The intervention sequence was low arousal environment, rapport building, predictability, functionally equivalent skills teaching, and differential reinforcement strategies. Results Substantial reductions in target behaviours were observed, along with incremental improvement in mental health scores and quality-of-life scores. Conclusion The study demonstrates the efficacy of positive behaviour support for people with exceptionally severe behaviour in individually designed services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-220
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Multi-element behaviour support
  • Positive behaviour support
  • Severe challenging behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • General Psychology

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