Camel milk-derived probiotic strains encapsulated in camel casein and gelatin complex microcapsules: Stability against thermal challenge and simulated gastrointestinal digestion conditions

Aarthi Devarajan, Priti Mudgil, Fatima Aldhaheri, Fathala Hamed, Sushil Dhital, Sajid Maqsood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Probiotics have received increased attention due to their nutritional and health-promoting benefits. However, their viability is often impeded during food processing as well as during their gastrointestinal transit before reaching the colon. In this study, probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus MF00960, Pediococcus pentosaceus MF000967, and Lactobacillus paracasei DSM20258 were encapsulated within sodium alginate, camel casein (CC), camel skin gelatin (CSG) and CC:CSG (1:1 wt/wt) wall materials. All 3 strains in encapsulated form showed an enhanced survival rate upon simulated gastrointestinal digestion compared with free cells. Among the encapsulating matrices, probiotics embedded in CC showed higher viability and is attributed to less porous structure of CC that provided more protection to entrapped probiotics cells. Similarly, thermal tolerance at 50°C and 70°C of all 3 probiotic strains were significantly higher upon encapsulation in CC and CC:CSG. Scanning electron microscope micrographs showed probiotic strains embedded in the dense protein matrix of CC and CSG. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that CC- and CSG-encapsulated probiotic strains exhibited the amide bands with varying intensity with no significant change in the structural conformation. Probiotic strains encapsulated in CC and CC:CSG showed higher retention of inhibitory properties against α-glucosidase, α-amylase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV, pancreatic lipase, and cholesteryl esterase compared with free cells upon exposure to simulated gastrointestinal digestion conditions. Therefore, CC alone or in combination with CSG as wall materials provided effective protection to cells, retained their bioactive properties, which was comparable to sodium alginate as wall materials. Thus, CC and CC:CSG can be an efficient wall material for encapsulation of probiotics for food applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1862-1877
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Lactobacillus
  • bioactive properties
  • camel milk
  • in vitro digestion
  • microencapsulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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