Comparison of Physiological and Perceptional Responses to 5-m Forward, Forward-Backward, and Lateral Shuttle Running

Chong Gao, Xiaolu Wang, Guochao Zhang, Li Huang, Mengyuan Han, Bo Li, George P. Nassis, Yongming Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological and perceptional responses to forward, forward-backward, and lateral shuttle running. Methods: Twenty-four eligible male subjects performed a maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test and three directional modes (i.e., forward, forward-backward, and lateral) of 5-m shuttle running at the speed of 6 km⋅h–1 for 5 min on separate days. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (VO2) were continuously measured during the whole tests. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was inquired and recorded immediately after the test. Capillary blood samples were collected from the earlobe during the recovery to determine the peak value of blood lactate concentration ([La]peak). Results: Running directional mode had significant effects on HR (F = 72.761, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.760), %HRmax (F = 75.896, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.767), VO2 (F = 110.320, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.827), %VO2max (F = 108.883, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.826), [La]peak (F = 55.529, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.707), and RPE (F = 26.268, P < 0.001, η2p = 0.533). All variables were significantly different between conditions (P ≤ 0.026), with the variables highest in lateral shuttle running and lowest in forward shuttle running. The effect sizes indicated large magnitude in the differences of all variables between conditions (ES = 0.86–2.83, large) except the difference of RPE between forward and forward-backward shuttle running (ES = 0.62, moderate). Conclusion: These findings suggest that the physiological and perceptional responses in shuttle running at the same speed depend on the directional mode, with the responses highest in lateral shuttle running, and lowest in forward shuttle running.

Original languageEnglish
Article number780699
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 17 2022

Keywords

  • change of direction
  • oxygen consumption
  • physiological demands
  • running modes
  • shuttle runs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of Physiological and Perceptional Responses to 5-m Forward, Forward-Backward, and Lateral Shuttle Running'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this