Conservation through utilization: A case study of the indigenous forage grasses of the Arabian Peninsula

J. M. Peacock, M. E. Ferguson, G. A. Alhadrami, I. R. McCann, A. Al Hajoj, A. Saleh, R. Karnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the Arabian Peninsula, rangeland biodiversity and animal production exist in a delicate balance. Increases in the small ruminant population has meant that the palatable indigenous plant species have been severely overgrazed. Exotic species are now being grown for fodder, however these use large volumes of irrigation water, and the practice is not sustainable. One approach to the conservation of biological diversity and the promotion of sustainable animal production is the conservation and utilization of these indigenous plant species. Seeds of three priority grasses have been collected, multiplied and evaluations for their water use efficiency and nutritive values made.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-28
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Arid Environments
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

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