Developmental associations of actual motor competence and perceived physical competence with health-related fitness in schoolchildren over a four-year follow-up

Arto Gråstén, Iiris Kolunsarka, Mikko Huhtiniemi, Timo Jaakkola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The developmental associations between actual motor competence (MC), perceived physical competence (PC), and health-related fitness (HRF) in schoolchildren were investigated over a four-year period. Participants were 1147 (girls 582, boys 565) schoolchildren aged between 11 and 13 years (M = 11.27 ± 0.33 years) in the beginning of the study. Data were collected at five time points in 2017–2021. MC was measured with three product-oriented (i.e., outcome of the movement) motor competence skill tests: side-to-side jump, five-leaps, and throw-catch. PC was assessed with the Physical Self-Perception Profile. HRF was assessed with the 20m shuttle run, curl-up, and push-up tests. The random intercept cross-lagged panel model with birth month and sex as covariates, was tested using repeated measures (within level) and PC, MC, and HRF levels (between level). The key findings were: 1) PC, MC, and HRF levels were reciprocally associated over time; 2) repeated measures of HRF at each time point were positively associated with PC and MC one year later; 3) PC decreased, MC increased, and HRF remained stable over time; and 4) MC was more important than PC in explaining the variability in HRF levels and repeated measures. The positive reciprocal associations of MC, PC, and HRF from late childhood to early adolescence found in this study are important as they indicate that to support HRF in schoolchildren, both MC and PC can be promoted through investment in MC exercises.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102279
JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Exercise
  • Health
  • Muscular fitness
  • Random intercept cross-lagged panel model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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