Early identification within inclusive early childhood curriculum: an ethnographic study from New Zealand

Qilong Zhang, Val Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inclusive education has long been implemented in regular educational settings in many jurisdictions including New Zealand (NZ). Since many children with special educational needs (CSEN) are not identifiable in a family environment, to ensure all CSEN are supported in a timely manner, early identification should be an integral component of the inclusive curriculum. Adopting focused ethnography, this study investigated how CSEN were identified within the mandated national curriculum framework in a regular early childhood setting in NZ. The data analysis revealed: (1) A common belief about the importance of early identification was shared by the parents and teachers; (2) A three-step (noticing, assessing, referring, NAR) process of early identification was implemented; (3) The implementation of the NAR process was in compliance with the four principles of NZ’s national curriculum framework. The implication of the early identification process was discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)310-321
Number of pages12
JournalEarly Child Development and Care
Volume190
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 17 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • curriculum
  • early childhood
  • early identification
  • Inclusive education
  • New Zealand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics

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