Exploring the perceived knowledge of teacher educators and pre-service teachers on the differentiated instruction practices of teacher educators

William Nketsia, Maxwell P. Opoku, Michael Amponteng, Wisdom Kwadwo Mprah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Inclusive education involves creating effective learning environments that welcome and meet the diverse needs of all students. Differentiated instruction (DI) has been identified as a key instructional approach to addressing the diverse needs of all students in regular classrooms. While there is a large body of literature on DI, that relating to the non-Western context is sparse. Using comprehensive model of DI as a conceptual framework, this study examined teacher educators’ perceived usage of DI practices in teacher training institutions in Ghana. It used a questionnaire design based on the tenets of model for data collection. A total of 1,002 participants (199 teacher educators and 883 pre-service teachers) were recruited from four teacher training institutions in Ghana. The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis, t-tests, and Hayes’s model for performing moderation analysis. The results show differences between pre-service teachers and teacher educators, with the former rating the latter lower on the perceived usage of DI. The study concludes with a discussion on the training needs of teacher educators in the usage of DI and enabling them to effectively model appropriate differentiated teaching experiences to beginning teachers.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1356675
JournalFrontiers in Education
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Keywords

  • children with disabilities
  • differentiated instruction
  • Ghana
  • inclusive education
  • teacher preparation
  • university colleges of education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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