First record of Raorchestes longchuanensis Yang and Li, 1978 (Anura: Rhacophoridae) from northeastern Bangladesh suggests wide habitat tolerance

Hassan Al-Razi, Marjan Maria, Sabit Hasan, Sabir Bin Muzaffar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Raorchestes is a genus of small bush frog characterized by an absence of vomerine teeth, direct development without free swimming larvae, and a transparent gular pouch while calling. During a larger study on canopy fauna in the northeastern region of Bangladesh, five specimens of a small bush frog were collected from Satchari National Park in June and July 2017. This species was confirmed as Raorchestes longchuanensis using both morphometric and genetic analyses. Although this species was originally described from Yunnan, China, the authors speculated that it may be found in neighboring countries adjacent to the original records, including northern Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam. However, the current finding suggests that the species could be more widespread and resilient, spanning westwards through to northeastern India and Bangladesh. Data are also provided on coloration, habitat, natural history, and vocalizations of this little-known species. Although the species is designated Least Concern according to IUCN, more comprehensive studies should be undertaken to better understand its biology and population status to aid in a more comprehensive global conservation assessment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-131
Number of pages13
JournalAmphibian and Reptile Conservation
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Amphibian
  • Asia
  • Bush frog
  • Dna
  • Range extension
  • Satchari national park

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'First record of Raorchestes longchuanensis Yang and Li, 1978 (Anura: Rhacophoridae) from northeastern Bangladesh suggests wide habitat tolerance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this