‘From my world to yours…’: exploring the availability of social networks among parents from culturally diverse backgrounds caring for children with developmental disabilities in Australia

Emma Pearson, Maxwell Peprah Opoku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study of families from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) families in Australia caring for children with disability. The study aimed to contribute insights into the unique experiences, challenges and supports that characterise experiences of families of a child with disability living in a country where the mainstream culture is different from their own. Four families from different cultural backgrounds participated in the study over a period of nine months. During this time, they participated in a series of semi-structured interviews during which they shared their encounters with formal early intervention services and reflected on important informal supports. Findings presented here indicate three key areas associated with accessing informal supports that can pose challenges for families who hold values that are different from those of the dominant culture: lack of social support; cultural adaptations, and socialization problems and coping strategies. The findings indicate that formal services could ameliorate feelings of social isolation by enabling parents to access informal supports such as parenting groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-397
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Keywords

  • Australia
  • child development
  • culture
  • immigrants
  • Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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