Identifying childhood movement profiles and tracking physical activity and sedentary time across 1 year

Timo Jaakkola, Sami Yli-Piipari, David F. Stodden, Mikko Huhtiniemi, Kasper Salin, Sanni Seppälä, Harto Hakonen, Arto Gråstén

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study identified movement profiles in childhood and tracked longitudinal changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time across identified profiles. A sample consisted of 491 Finnish 5th Grade children (girls 275, boys 216; Mage = 11.27 ± 0.32). A latent profile analysis strategy was used to identify homogenous movement profiles that included measures of motor competence, perceived competence, and cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness. To examine a 1-year change in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time among movement profiles, a mixed between-within-subjects analysis of variance with Tukey's post hoc tests was conducted. Results revealed three movement profiles: “At-Risk Movement Profile” “Intermediate Movement Profile" and “Desirable Movement Profile.” Results demonstrated that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among the Intermediate Movement Profile declined across 1 year (P <.01), whereas there was no change in sedentary time. To conclude, results of the study indicated remarkable differences in movement skill and physical fitness variables, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity engagement between the At-Risk Movement Profile and other two profiles. Special attention should be given to the lowest profile of children to promote their movement capabilities and physical activity engagement. It is noteworthy that At-Risk Movement Profile included children more than one-third of the sample.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-487
Number of pages8
JournalTranslational Sports Medicine
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • a latent profile analysis
  • health-related fitness
  • motor competence
  • perceived physical competence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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