Learning methods and strategies of anatomy among medical students in two different Institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Omar A. Al-Mohrej, Noura K. Al-Ayedh, Emad M. Masuadi, Nader S. Al-Kenani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Anatomy instructors adopt individual teaching methods and strategies to convey anatomical information to medical students for learning. Students also exhibit their own individual learning preferences. Instructional methods preferences vary between both instructors and students across different institutions. Aims: In attempt to bridge the gap between teaching methods and the students’ learning preferences, this study aimed to identify students’ learning methods and different strategies of studying anatomy in two different Saudi medical schools in Riyadh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study, conducted in Saudi Arabia in April 2015, utilized a three-section questionnaire, which was distributed to a consecutive sample of 883 medical students to explore their methods and strategies in learning and teaching anatomy in two separate institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: Medical students’ learning styles and preferences were found to be predominantly affected by different cultural backgrounds, gender, and level of study. Many students found it easier to understand and remember anatomy components using study aids. In addition, almost half of the students felt confident to ask their teachers questions after class. The study also showed that more than half of the students found it easier to study by concentrating on a particular part of the body rather than systems. Students’ methods of learning were distributed equally between memorizing facts and learning by hands-on dissection. In addition, the study showed that two thirds of the students felt satisfied with their learning method and believed it was well suited for anatomy. Conclusions: There is no single teaching method which proves beneficial; instructors should be flexible in their teaching in order to optimize students’ academic achievements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S15-S21
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 16 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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