Nightmare experiences and perceived ethnic discrimination amongst female university students in the United Arab Emirates: a cross-sectional study

Maria Campo Redondo, Gabriel Andrade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Perceived ethnic discrimination is known to be associated with anxiety and depression, and in turn, anxiety and depression are known to be associated with nightmare frequency and distress. This elicits a question: is perceived ethnic discrimination associated with nightmare frequency and distress? In this study, 179 female university students from the United Arab Emirates were assessed to answer that question. Results showed that while anxiety and depression were related to nightmare experiences, perceived ethnic discrimination was a stronger predictor of nightmare experiences. We posit two explanations for this finding: one based on psychoanalytical insights, and the other based on the Disposition–Stress model with neurobiological correlates. No significant differences were found across ethnicity when it comes to nightmare experiences or perceived ethnic discrimination. This is an encouraging sign of optimal societal integration in the United Arab Emirates.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sleep Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • nightmare distress
  • nightmare frequency
  • perceived ethnic discrimination
  • psychoanalysis
  • United Arab Emirates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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