‘One child, two schools’: Teachers' perspectives on the dual enrolment of students with disabilities in private special and inclusive schools in the United Arab Emirates

Mahra Saeed Haj Ali, Maxwell Peprah Opoku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There are efforts being taken to provide students with disabilities access to education in a dual context, namely, some days at inclusive schools and others at special schools. However, there is limited information regarding how teachers are contending with such practices. This study explored teachers' perceptions of students with disabilities' education in the dual enrolment education system of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Specifically, the social education model was conceptualised to understand teachers' perceptions, collaborative efforts, resources and challenges in terms of dual enrolment practices. The study's sample consisted of 10 teachers at private schools, consisting of five special education teachers and five general education teachers, recruited from Al Ain, the third largest city in the UAE. Despite the participants' positive responses concerning dual enrolment, the results showed the system's poor implementation for students with disabilities. This was the result of a lack of collaboration, communication and a shared plan to support the development of children with disabilities across schools. This study concludes by recommending a national framework to guide the implementation of a dual enrolment system in the UAE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-348
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Research in Special Educational Needs
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Keywords

  • children with disabilities
  • inclusive education
  • parents
  • special education
  • teachers
  • United Arab Emirates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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