Social Work Codes of Ethics in the Arab Countries of Western Asia: A Comparison to the IFSW Global Statement of Ethical Principles

Taghreed M.Abu Sarhan, Lacey Sloan, Karen S. Rotabi-Casares, Shamma Juma Hamad Alfalasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compares social work codes of ethics in the Arab countries of Western Asia (Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Lebanon, Bahrain, Yemen, Palestine, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Syria), to the International Federation of Social Workers Global Statement of Ethical Principles (2018). As of 2020 - with Qatar's recent addition of an MSW programme - there are over two dozen bachelor and/or master's degree programmes in social work in the Arab countries of Western Asia. As social work has grown as a profession in the region, many countries have formed national social work associations and are adopting or developing their own codes of ethics. Five of the twelve countries in the study developed their own original social work codes of ethics (Jordan, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Lebanon). Comparison of these codes to the IFSW principle statements reveals that most include at least half of the IFSW statements. In addition, three of the codes of ethics (Jordan, Kuwait and Bahrain) reference Islam, God and/or Islamic concepts. This study suggests that the IFSW Global Statement of Ethical Principles can serve as the guide it was intended to be in the development of social work codes of ethics around the globe, including Arab-Islamic countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3003-3023
Number of pages21
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2022

Keywords

  • codes of ethics
  • ethics
  • Islam
  • multicultural
  • western Asia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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