Supervisor support as a predictor of burnout and therapeutic self-efficacy in therapists working in ABA schools

Jennifer A. Gibson, Ian M. Grey, Richard P. Hastings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Very little is known about factors potentially affecting the performance of therapists delivering applied behavior analysis (ABA) interventions for young children with autism. Eighty-one therapists working in ABA schools participated in a questionnaire study focused on their reports of burnout and perceived therapeutic self-efficacy in their work role. Perceived supervisor support played a central role in the prediction of reduced therapist burnout and increased therapeutic self-efficacy. In addition, perceived supervisor support moderated the impact of work demands on personal accomplishment burnout. Those therapists reporting high work demands and lower levels of supervisor support had lower personal accomplishment scores on the Maslach burnout inventory. Clinical implications include the importance of supervisor support for therapists and also supervisor style.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1024-1030
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Intensive behavioral intervention
  • Perceived therapeutic efficacy
  • Schools
  • Therapists
  • Work stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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