The effects of multi-walled CNT in Bamboo/Glass fibre hybrid composites: Tensile and flexural properties

Ariff F.M. Nor, Mohamed T.H. Sultan, Mohammad Jawaid, Abd R. Abu Talib, Ahmad M.R. Azmi, Ahmad S. Harmaen, Ainun Z.M. Asa'ari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, polymer nanocomposites have been fabricated using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement nanofillers. However, the effect of incorporating CNT/polymer into hybrid composites with natural fibre is not clear. This study investigated the effect of using multi-walled carbon nanotube material (MWCNT) as the nanofiller on the tensile and flexural properties of bamboo/glass fibre hybrid composites. Composites containing various weight fractions of CNTs (0.1 wt.%, 0.3 wt.%, 0.5 wt.%, and 1.0 wt.%) were compared with the control hybrid composites. The hybrid composites were prepared with epoxy resin. The experimental results revealed an increase in the tensile strength of the composites with the addition of up to 0.5 wt.% CNTs (+7.7% over the control hybrid). However, beyond this value, i.e., with 1.0 wt.% CNT additives, the composite strength showed a remarkable decrease (- 36.8% compared with the control hybrid). Moreover, introducing CNTs into hybrid composites resulted reduced the flexural properties with increasing weight fractions as low as 8.45% compared with the controls. In sum, the tensile properties increased with the addition of up to 0.5 wt.% CNTs, but there was a decrease in the flexural properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4404-4415
Number of pages12
JournalBioResources
Volume13
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bamboo
  • CNT
  • Flexural
  • Hybrid
  • Nanofillers
  • Tensile

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of multi-walled CNT in Bamboo/Glass fibre hybrid composites: Tensile and flexural properties'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this