The impact of mother's education on indicators of school performance of first through third grade primary school children living in low socioeconomic areas in Khartoum, Sudan.

S. Washi, D. Cowan, R. D. Terry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines factors related to school achievement among low-income urban families in the Sudan. Data were obtained during January-February 1992 from a sample of 198 students aged 6-10 years from boys' and girls' schools in Ombada settlement in Khartoum, Elhag-Yousif in Khartoum North, and Arkwait in Khartoum. 53.5% of the sample were first enrolled in school after the age of 7 years. About 30% were enrolled prior to the age of 7 years. 4.5% had repeated a grade. About 25% had perfect attendance. 37% were absent for 1-2% of school days; 18.2% were absent for 3-4% of school days, and a similar percentage were absent for 5% or more of school days. Over 66% were absent due to medical reasons. About 41% of math scores and 58% of language scores were above 50, out of a possible total score of 60. 29% of math scores and 21% of language scores ranged from 41 to 50. 13.5% of math scores and 10.5% of language scores were failing. Class size ranged from 53 to 102 persons per class. Children who were enrolled in the higher grades tended to have been enrolled at a later age. The age of enrollment was negatively related to maternal educational level and weight for age. Poorly educated mothers tended to enroll their children later, and lower weight-for-age children tended to be enrolled later. Students from boys' schools in Khartoum and schools in the Khartoum area had a higher absenteeism rate. Students whose fathers were laborers or self-employed had greater absences. Children whose mothers had lower educational levels had greater absenteeism. Children with lower weight-for-height had more absenteeism. Absenteeism was positively correlated with height-for-age and the number of types of illnesses that the child had during the school year. Students who lived in Khartoum North had higher scores. Findings indicate that educational outcomes were related to home background and health conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-55
Number of pages12
JournalThe Ahfad journal
Volume10
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

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