The mediating effects of germane cognitive load on the relationship between instructional design and students’ future behavioral intention

Jamie Costley, Christopher Lange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instructional design is an important aspect of the learning experience within formal online courses. One way in which online instructional design may benefit students is by increasing their future behavioral intention to use educational materials. This is important because research has revealed that students’ use of educational resources is strongly connected with academic success. Additionally, higher quality instructional design will increase students’ levels of germane cognitive load, which is a powerful indicator of learning. This study surveyed a group of students (n = 1314) who participated in formal online classes in South Korea to investigate the relationships between instructional design and germane load, germane load and future behavioral intention, as well as instructional design and future behavioral intention. Results showed positive correlation among each of these relationships. Furthermore, a mediation model was used, and results showed that germane load completely mediates the relationship between instructional design and future behavioral intention. These relationships are examined to better understand learning and future behavioral intention in relation to instructional design within online learning environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-187
Number of pages14
JournalElectronic Journal of e-Learning
Volume15
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavioral intention
  • Cognitive load
  • E-learning
  • Germane load
  • Instructional design
  • MOOC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The mediating effects of germane cognitive load on the relationship between instructional design and students’ future behavioral intention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this