Topsoil drying combined with increased sulfur supply leads to enhanced aliphatic glucosinolates in Brassica juncea leaves and roots

Yu Tong, Elke Gabriel-Neumann, Benard Ngwene, Angelika Krumbein, Eckhard George, Stefanie Platz, Sascha Rohn, Monika Schreiner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The decrease of water availability is leading to an urgent demand to reduce the plants' water supply. This study evaluates the effect of topsoil drying, combined with varying sulfur (S) supply on glucosinolates in Brassica juncea in order to reveal whether a partial root drying may already lead to a drought-induced glucosinolate increase promoted by an enhanced S supply. Without decreasing biomass, topsoil drying initiated an increase in aliphatic glucosinolates in leaves and in topsoil dried roots supported by increased S supply. Simultaneously, abscisic acid was determined, particularly in dehydrated roots, associated with an increased abscisic acid concentration in leaves under topsoil drying. This indicates that the dehydrated roots were the direct interface for the plants' stress response and that the drought-induced accumulation of aliphatic glucosinolates is related to abscisic acid formation. Indole and aromatic glucosinolates decreased, suggesting that these glucosinolates are less involved in the plants' response to drought.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)190-196
    Number of pages7
    JournalFood Chemistry
    Volume152
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2014

    Keywords

    • 2-Propenyl glucosinolate
    • Abscisic acid
    • N:S ratio
    • Topsoil drying
    • Vegetable mustard

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Analytical Chemistry
    • Food Science

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